Sunday, 3 July 2016

Foods to Avoid When You Have High Blood Pressure

Your family physician probably already told you to  avoid eating fattening hamburgers and salty fries as part of your hypertension diet. However, there are foods you may not consider harmful that can wreak havoc on your blood pressure. The main culprit when it comes to skyrocketing blood pressure levels is sodium, found in more foods that you might expect. 

If you have hypertension it is advisable you stay away or limit these high-sodium foods in your hypertension diet: 
  • Dried, preserved, or salted meats, like bacon, ham, beef jerky, and pepperoni
  • Heavily salted snacks, like peanuts, chips, or crackers
  • Canned foods and meals, including vegetables and soups
  • Frozen foods and dinners
  • Sauces, condiments, and marinades
  • Table salt or salty seasonings 
  • Pickles 
Foods That Help Manage High Blood Pressure 

There are plenty of foods that can help lower your high blood pressure. Studies show that potassium is very important in helping to so and is a key ingredient in a diet that helps reduce hypertension. Choose these high-potassium, low-sodium fruits and vegetables to help manage your blood pressure: 


Raisins, prunes and prune juice
Citrus fruits and juices
Honeydew, cantaloupe, and watermelons
Avocados
Apples and apple juice
Bananas
Fresh corn
Cooked squash, eggplant, cabbage, and cauliflower
Lima beans and peas
Peppers and radishes
Baked or boiled potatoes 


Sherldine Tomlinson, R.Kin, PhD candidate 

Saturday, 19 December 2015

Simple Ways to Unclog Your Arteries Naturally

According to research atherosclerosis the progressive clogging of the arteries is the #1 killer on the planet.  A complex process, involving autoimmunity, infection, dietary incompatibilities, and many known and unknown factors, it is – despite conventional medical opinion – entirely preventable, and in some cases reversible.

Below is peer-reviewed, published research proving the fact:

B Vitamins – yes, something as simple as adding a source of B-complex to your regimen can prevent the juggernaut of heart disease from taking your life prematurely. A doubled-blind, randomized study, published in 2005, in the journal Atherosclerosis found that a simple intervention using 2.5 mg folic acid, 25 mg Vitamin B6, and 0.5mg Vitamin B12 for 1 year, resulted in significant reductions in arterial thickness (as measured by intima media thickeness).[1] Even niacin[2]-[3]or folic acid[4]-[5] alone has been show to have this effect in patients. [Note: Always opt for natural sources of the B-group vitamins, including probiotic supplementation (which produce the entire complement for you), or a whole food extract, versus synthetic or semi-synthetic vitamins which, sadly, predominate on the market today].

Garlic – as we have documented extensively previously, garlic can save your life. It has been found to regress plaque buildup in the arteries, among many other potentially life-saving health benefits.[6]

Pomegranate – this super healing fruit has been found to regress plaque buildup in the arteries,[7]-[8] as well as being demonstrated to provide dozens of validated health benefits, including replacing the function of the mammalian ovary!

Fermented Cabbage – Kimchi, a Korean recipe, which includes fermented cabbage, hot pepper, and various other ingredients, including fermented fish, appears to stall the atherosclerotic process in the animal model.[9] Additionally, strains of good bacteria in kimchi have been found capable of degrading toxic chemicals that can additional bodily harm.

L-Arginine: This amino acid is capable of preventing arterial thickening – up to 24% reduction! -- in the animal model.[10]-[11]We have done an extensive literature review on arginine supplementation and have found that in over 30 studies demonstrating this fact addition to 150 known health benefits, it is capable of addressing the underlying dysfunction associated with cardiovascular disease: endothelial dysfunction, with no less than 20 studies proving this fact.

Turmeric (curcumin): the primary polyphenol in the Indian spice turmeric known as curcumin has been found to be an excellent cardioprotective, with over 30 studies demonstrating this fact. One study found that curcumin prevented damage to the arteries associated with blockage (neointima formation).[12]

Sesame Seed: probably one of the most underappreciated super foods on the planet, sesame seed, which we have shown is as effective as Tylenol for arthritic pain, may be an excellent cardioprotective substance, ideally suited for preventing the progression of atherosclerosis. One animal study found it was capable of preventing atherosclerosis lesion formation.[13]

References:

[1] Uwe Till, Peter Röhl, Almut Jentsch, Heiko Till, Andreas Müller, Klaus Bellstedt, Dietmar Plonné, Horst S Fink, Rüdiger Vollandt, Ulrich Sliwka, Falko H Herrmann, Henning Petermann, Reiner Riezler. Decrease of carotid intima-media thickness in patients at risk to cerebral ischemia after supplementation with folic acid, Vitamins B6 and B12. Atherosclerosis. 2005 Jul;181(1):131-5. Epub 2005 Feb 16. PMID: 15939064

[2] Allen J Taylor, Hyun J Lee, Lance E Sullenberger. The effect of 24 months of combination statin and extended-release niacin on carotid intima-media thickness: ARBITER 3. Curr Med Res Opin. 2006 Nov;22(11):2243-50 PMID: 17076985

 [3] M Thoenes, A Oguchi, S Nagamia, C S Vaccari, R Hammoud, G E Umpierrez, B V Khan. The effects of extended-release niacin on carotid intimal media thickness, endothelial function and inflammatory markers in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Int J Clin Pract. 2007 Nov;61(11):1942-8. PMID: 17935553

[4] George Ntaios, Christos Savopoulos, Dimitrios Karamitsos, Ippoliti Economou, Evangelos Destanis, Ioannis Chryssogonidis, Ifigenia Pidonia, Pantelis Zebekakis, Christos Polatides, Michael Sion, Dimitrios Grekas, Apostolos Hatzitolios. The effect of folic acid supplementation on carotid intima-media thickness in patients with cardiovascular risk: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Int J Cardiol. 2009 Feb 6. PMID: 19201496

[5] T P Smith, C P Cruz, A T Brown, J F Eidt, M M Moursi. Folate supplementation inhibits intimal hyperplasia induced by a high-homocysteine diet in a rat carotid endarterectomy model. J Vasc Surg. 2001 Sep;34(3):474-81. PMID: 11533600

[6] G Siegel, A Walter, S Engel, A Walper, F Michel. [Pleiotropic effects of garlic]. Wien Med Wochenschr. 1999;149(8-10):217-24. PMID: 10483684

[7] Michael Aviram, Mira Rosenblat, Diana Gaitini, Samy Nitecki, Aaron Hoffman, Leslie Dornfeld, Nina Volkova, Dita Presser, Judith Attias, Harley Liker, Tony Hayek. Pomegranate juice consumption for 3 years by patients with carotid artery stenosis reduces common carotid intima-media thickness, blood pressure and LDL oxidation. Clin Nutr. 2004 Jun;23(3):423-33. PMID: 15158307

[8] Michael H Davidson, Kevin C Maki, Mary R Dicklin, Steven B Feinstein, Marysue Witchger, Marjorie Bell, Darren K McGuire, Jean-Claude Provost, Harley Liker, Michael Aviram. Effects of consumption of pomegranate juice on carotid intima-media thickness in men and women at moderate risk for coronary heart disease. Am J Cardiol. 2009 Oct 1;104(7):936-42. PMID: 19766760

[9] Hyun Ju Kim, Jin Su Lee, Hae Young Chung, Su Hee Song, Hongsuk Suh, Jung Sook Noh, Yeong Ok Song. 3-(4'-hydroxyl-3',5'-dimethoxyphenyl)propionic acid, an active principle of kimchi, inhibits development of atherosclerosis in rabbits. J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Dec 12;55(25):10486-92. Epub 2007 Nov 16. PMID: 18004805

[10] M G Davies, H Dalen, J H Kim, L Barber, E Svendsen, P O Hagen. Control of accelerated vein graft atheroma with the nitric oxide precursor: L-arginine. J Surg Res. 1995 Jul;59(1):35-42. PMID: 7630134

[11] Mehdi Nematbakhsh, Shaghayegh Haghjooyjavanmard, Farzaneh Mahmoodi, Ali Reza Monajemi. The prevention of endothelial dysfunction through endothelial cell apoptosis inhibition in a hypercholesterolemic rabbit model: the effect of L-arginine supplementation. Lipids Health Dis. 2008;7:27. Epub 2008 Aug 2. PMID: 18673573

[12] Xiaoping Yang, D Paul Thomas, Xiaochun Zhang, Bruce W Culver, Brenda M Alexander, William J Murdoch, Mysore N A Rao, David A Tulis, Jun Ren, Nair Sreejayan. Curcumin inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cell function and injury-induced neointima formation. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2006 Jan;26(1):85-90. Epub 2005 Oct 20. PMID: 16239599

[13] Shylesh Bhaskaran, Nalini Santanam, Meera Penumetcha, Sampath Parthasarathy. Inhibition of atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-negative mice by sesame oil. J Med Food. 2006 Winter;9(4) PMID: 17201634


Thursday, 26 November 2015

How Blood Pressure Causes Stroke

Stroke is a leading cause of death and severe, long-term disability. Since managing high blood pressure, also called high blood pressure or hypertension, is the most important thing you can do to lessen your risk for stroke, treatment for high blood pressure can your save life. 

What is a stroke?

Stroke is a disease that affects the blood vessels that supply blood to the brain.


A stroke occurs when a blood vessel to the brain is either blocked by a clot (ischemic stroke) or bursts (hemorrhagic stroke). When that happens, part of the brain is no longer getting the blood and oxygen it needs, so it starts to die. Your brain controls your movement and thoughts, so a stroke doesn't only hurt your brain. It also hurts the brain's ability to think and control body functions. Strokes can affect language, memory and vision as well as cause paralysis and other health issues. 


Below is a great video that describes how high blood pressure cause a stroke :






Tuesday, 17 November 2015

Stroke warning signs educational musical sing-a-long video

Stroke knows no boundaries - every 2 seconds someone in the world has a stroke. Globally someone dies of this leading cause of disability every 5 seconds, ending 6.4 million lives each year. 

On October 29, 2015 marked the 10th annual World Stroke Day, established by the World Stroke Organization (WSO) to underscore the serious nature and high rates of stroke all over our planet, raise awareness of its prevention and treatment and ensure better care and support for survivors. 

The WSO has adopted the acronym F.A.S.T. to make stroke warning signs easy to understand and widely known. This past World Stroke Day, people of all ages and all cultures were invited to sing The F.A.S.T. Song in the musical styling of their choice and share it with friends.

Help raise awareness this year.






Friday, 23 October 2015

Conditions That Increase Risk for Stroke


Certain conditions can increase your risk of stroke. Some risk factors are treatable and others are not. By treating the conditions you can, with lifestyle changes, medicines, or surgery, you can lower your risk.

Previous Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

If you have already had a stroke or a transient ischemic attack (TIA), also known as a "mini-stroke," your chances of having another stroke are higher.

High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is a major risk factor for stroke. It occurs when the pressure of the blood in your arteries and other blood vessels is too high.

There are often no symptoms to signal high blood pressure. Lowering blood pressure by changes in lifestyle or by medication can reduce your risk for stroke.

High Cholesterol

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made by the liver or found in certain foods. Your liver makes enough for your body’s needs, but we often get more cholesterol from the foods we eat. If we take in more cholesterol than the body can use, the extra cholesterol can build up in the arteries, including those of the brain. This can lead to narrowing of the arteries, stroke, and other problems.

A blood test can detect of the amount of cholesterol and triglycerides (a related kind of fat) in your blood.

Heart Disease

Common heart disorders can increase your risk for stroke. For example, coronary artery disease increases your risk for stroke because plaque builds up in the arteries and blocks the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the brain. Other heart conditions, such as heart valve defects, irregular heartbeat (including atrial fibrillation), and enlarged heart chambers, can cause blood clots that may break loose and cause a stroke.

Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus also increases the risk for stroke. Your body needs glucose (sugar) for energy. Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas that helps move glucose from the food you eat to your body's cells. If you have diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin, can’t use its own insulin as well as it should, or both.

Diabetes causes sugars to build up in the blood. Talk to your doctor about ways to manage diabetes and control other risk factors.

Sickle Cell Disease

Sickle cell disease is a blood disorder associated with ischemic stroke that mainly affects black and Hispanic children. The disease causes some red blood cells to form an abnormal sickle shape. A stroke can happen if sickle cells get stuck in a blood vessel and block the flow of blood to the brain.




Saturday, 26 September 2015

Hibiscus tea to lower blood pressure

Drinking tea made from flowers of the hibiscus shrub may help cut blood pressure, a study has shown. Just three cups of hibiscus tea a day were shown to reduce the blood pressure of people at risk of heart disease, stroke and kidney disease in a study.

The drink contains extracts from the hibiscus sabdariffa flower, which boasts antioxidants that help to rid the body of harmful free radicals – destructive molecules that damage cells and DNA.

Studies have linked antioxidants to many health benefits, including protection against heart disease and cancer.

The hibiscus tea research was carried out by nutrition scientist Diane McKay and presented to the American Heart Association's annual conference.
Sixty-five people aged between 30 and 70 with blood pressure levels that put them in the "at risk" bracket were split into two groups. The first group drank hibiscus three times a day and the second group were given a placebo.

Sherldine Tomlinson.